Zagreb tenders ahead of potential DF ban

By Doug Newhouse |

The Croatian Government has issued a tender for companies to bid for the construction of a E.220m ($301m) second terminal at Zagreb Airport and the subsequent management of Zagreb’s two terminals to the same company thereafter. At the same time, Croatia is hoping to join the EU by 2013, although if its application is successful, its international airports would obviously lose all duty free sales currently made to EU visitors.

The Ministry of the Sea, Transport and Infrastructure published a tender for the first stage of selection last week as part of its EU candidate investment drive. This is aimed at reviving the company’s slow economy after two years of recession and ahead of EU accession talks this July, where Croatia is hoping to confirm its membership with effect from 2013.

The country’s Transport Ministry says it has already received expressions of interest from major airport developers for the project.

Tourism currently accounts for around 20% of revenues generated by Croatia’s economy and Zagreb is the country’s largest airport, handling around 2.2m passengers a year. The new terminal project is expected to increase the airport’s passenger handling capacity to 5m.

The current main supplier, consultant and duty free partner at Zagreb Airport is Gebr. Heinemann, which has worked closely with the airport for more than 25 years. It also operates in close partnership with Dubrovnik Airport in Croatia.

 

International

NOW LIVE: January ezine + landmark Annual Survey

The TRBusiness January 2024 ezine, containing the flagship Global Industry Survey, is now...

International

Harding+ announces departure of Chief Brand and Culture Officer Sue Gosling

Harding+ Chief Brand and Culture Officer Sue Gosling has stood down from her...

International

Global Travel Retail Awards 2024: Entries now open!

TRBusiness is delighted to announce that entries to the consumer-voted Global Travel Retail...

image description

In the Magazine

TRBusiness Magazine is free to access. Read the latest issue now.

E-mail this link to a friend