CLIA rallies global authorities & cruise community to align on recovery efforts

By Luke Barras-hill |

CruiseCubarestrictionsCruise Lines International Association (CLIA) has voiced its commitment to protecting and supporting industry partners amid the ongoing suspension of cruise operations across the world.

In an update issued yesterday (21 April), the voice of the cruise industry confirms it has been working with local and national governments, leading health authorities and cruise stakeholders to coordinate on a recovery path.

“The top priority for our entire community—including cruise lines, travel agents, ports, destinations, suppliers and beyond—continues to be the health and safety of passengers, crew and the communities in the places we visit,” read a statement.

“CLIA, on behalf of the wider cruise community, appreciates the constructive working relationships we share with global authorities around the world, including in North America, Europe, Australasia and South America.

“We will use this time during the suspension of global operations to continue to work with them to achieve our shared objective of going further still in our efforts to protect the health and safety of passengers, crew and public and to support recovery goals for tourism and business sector partners.”

NO SAIL ORDER EXTENDED

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) extended the country’s ‘No Sail Order’ on 9 April ­– a move that drew concerns from the CLIA on the ‘unintended economic consequences’ of ‘singling out the cruise industry’ – following an initial issuance on 14 March.

CLIA had announced on 13 March that its members would voluntarily and temporarily suspend cruise ship operations following the World Health Organization’s Covid-19 pandemic declaration.

Cruise-line-dock

The cruise industry contributes more than $150 billion annually in global economic activity while supporting over 1.2 million jobs, according to the CLIA.

In the statement, the CLIA points to the suspension as having ‘a profound detrimental effect on the global economy’, with cruise generating more than $150 billion per year in global economic activity and supporting more than 1.17 million jobs worldwide.

“The fact remains that the vast majority of more than 270 cruise ships within the CLIA member fleet were not affected by this virus,” it added. “This is due, in large part, to the aggressive measures adopted by CLIA oceangoing cruise lines in response to Covid-19 based on prevailing guidance from global health authorities, including the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization.

“Those measures include rigorous screening protocols, enhanced sanitation measures and the availability of onboard medical care and treatment 24/7.”

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