Los Angeles Airport (LAX) sees robust international rise

By Kevin Rozario |

Los Angeles International Airport (LAX), the biggest airport on the North American west coast, processed 34.34m passengers in the first six months of 2014, a rise of +6.5%.

 

The good news for duty free and travel retailers at the hub – which totally renewed the Tom Bradley International Terminal (TBIT) last autumn (see image below) – is that international traffic grew fastest at +9% to 9.27m ahead of the +5.6% growth in domestic passengers to 25.06m.

 

LAX operator, Los Angeles World Airports (LAWA) – a proprietary department of the City of Los Angeles – attributes the passenger increase to the US economy’s continuing improvement and to additional service on existing international routes by several US and foreign carriers, including Cathay Pacific to Hong Kong, Transaero and Aeroflot to Moscow, Korean Air to Seoul, and American Airlines to Sao Paulo.

 

In addition, Etihad Airways has launched a service to Abu Dhabi; Saudia to Jeddah-Riyadh; and Norwegian Air to London/Gatwick, Copenhagen, Stockholm, and Oslo.

 

LAWA says that June was the 10 month in a row of increasing passenger volume.

 

LAX is the sixth busiest airport in the world but still did not rank in the world’s top 30 international hubs in 2013. The west coast gateway offers 692 daily non-stop flights to 85 cities in the US and 928 weekly non-stop flights to 67 cities in 34 countries.

Middle East

MEADFA Conference 2024 ‘heading to Abu Dhabi on 17-19 November’

This year’s Middle East & Africa Duty Free Association (MEADFA) Conference will take...

International

DFWC Q1 2024 KPI Monitor indicates rise in duty free impulse purchases

Impulse purchasing within global duty free is on the rise, according to the latest Duty Free...

Asia & Pacific

Avolta details “bold and ambitious” goals to grow its APAC business

With a number of key developments coming to fruition, including its operations at Wuhan Tianhe...

image description

In the Magazine

TRBusiness Magazine is free to access. Read the latest issue now.

E-mail this link to a friend